Baseball Bat

Everything 4th Axis

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dciliberti
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2017 2:35 pm

Baseball Bat

Post by dciliberti »

Hope someone can help me out!!!! Last night I was finishing up a Baseball bat on the Shark with 4th axis. Got to engraving the name on it an power goes out. About half of the name is engraved. I rebooted everything this AM and started the run again but the "A" axis is off. Tried to engrave on the back of the bat. Is there a way to re-align the unit so I can continue the engraved name?

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bill z
Posts: 335
Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2015 9:09 am
Location: Spring, Texas USA

Re: Baseball Bat

Post by bill z »

This is really hard to do. However, If you have the name engraving as a separate G-Code and you can start a the same starting place (exactly) then all you would have to do is to re-run that G code.

I don't have a 4th axis, but, from what I read about the 4th axis, aren't you suppose to mark the starting angle of the 4th axis and start carving from a point on the 4th axis drive. If so, then it may be possible to get real close.

Best thing, it works. Worst thing, it messes up something that is already messed up.

Let us know.

dciliberti
Posts: 6
Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2017 2:35 pm

Re: Baseball Bat

Post by dciliberti »

I tried to run it again by I assume the "A" axis was at a different spot than when it initially started because it tried the back of the bat. I was hoping something in the G-code could help me align it properly?

scubanimal
Posts: 35
Joined: Wed Mar 06, 2013 2:05 pm

Re: Baseball Bat

Post by scubanimal »

This won't help exactly do what you're looking for, but may give you some ideas. I have run into the problem you have a few times and now have 0,0 a known x,y distance from the limits of my shark. Plus I usually punch a small hole with the bit a known distance from 0,0 just in case I lose it (power or other reason).

Another way I've used is if you can find a unique spot already carved on the bat (like in the lettering already carved) then go back into vcarve/aspire and find it, you'll get the position from the reference. then go back to the machine, put the bit exactly at that spot, zero out x & y then move the negative of those coordinates you pulled from vcarve/aspire and that will locate 0,0 for you. For instance if you have a very sharp corner 2" (x), 15" (y), then you position the bit on the bat at that point, set your x & y to zero, then using the step function, move -2 x and -15 y, re-zero your reference and you're there. Of course its only as good as your ability to find a unique spot. But my guess is for just lettering on a bat, you could do it. I do advise to set your z a little high and cut air the first time just to be sure.

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Kayvon
Posts: 462
Joined: Tue Oct 21, 2014 11:46 pm

Re: Baseball Bat

Post by Kayvon »

That's great advice. I've used the "unique spot" approach on multiple occasions and it's always worked out to some extent.

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